How to implement multicasting

While IP multicasting has many benefits, it also presents challenges. Multicasting delivers identical data to multiple receivers simultaneously, without transmitting multiple copies. So, when multicast data enter a subnet, the natural reaction of the switches is to send the multicast data to all their ports. This is referred to as multicast flooding and means that all the ports in that subnet (or at least their network interfaces) are required to process that multicast data even if they are not “seeing” this data. This can cause more data to travel across the network and slow or overrun the network infrastructure. IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol) offers a solution to this issue.

Our MediaCento™ IPX extends HDMI video over any IP network to as many as 250 distant screens—or to video walls. You can run the MediaCento IPX in unicast (one transmitter to one receiver)MediaCento IPX or multicast (one transmitter to many receivers) mode applications. The unit can also support a video wall, using multicast mode to output a single source video to a matrix of screens, so that you can project your HD content on a larger scale with one image divided over multiple video screens.

For MediaCento IPX multicasting applications, it’s very important to choose the right Ethernet switch, one that can handle the requirements to multicast data in your network without flooding your IP infrastructure. Continue reading

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How to choose the correct digital signage display

Shopping for digital signage displays is vastly different than shopping for flat-screen televisions for one’s home. When looking into purchasing displays for digital signage, the primary driver needs to be quality, not cost.

Consumer-grade displays
Consumer-grade LCDs are inexpensive and usually easily available. However, they do not come with extended warranties, usually only having warranty periods of a few months to a year. The screen performance and brightness are limited and do not last long in the scheme of things. Consumer-grade displays usually do not have a screen saver capability in case the video signal is lost, nor is an automatic on/off switch feature available.

displayCommercial-grade displays
In contrast, commercial-grade LCDs are designed specifically for the rigors of commercial digital signage applications and, as such, cost more. Digital signage usage differs significantly from consumer display usage, with displays needing to be on for longer hours. The hardware in commercial-grade displays enables more effective operation in commercial environments. Heat dissipation plates, cooling fans, and other electronics are components that enable these displays to be on for long hours with economical power consumption.

Other features in commercial grade LCDs may include video-wall processors, scheduling options, and lockable control panels. Commercial displays can be rotated, meaning they can be hung horizontally (landscape) or vertically (portrait). This flexibility enables businesses to use displays in a way that fits space requirements and desired look and feel of the environment. The bezel on commercial signage displays is uniform, unlike on consumer-grade TV screens, and usually much thinner than consumer-grade bezels. This enables creative layouts with more than one display.

Commercial displays also usually have warranties of several years. The industry standard warranty starts at three years, and some manufacturers are starting to offer standard five-year warranties. Continue reading